Our Power Inverter Lets Us Demonstrate Our Pellet Grills at Farmers Markets & Fairs!

Pellet Inverter

Our Power Inverter Lets Us Demonstrate Our Pellet Grills at Farmers Markets & Fairs!

“We sell our electronic wood-pellet grills at shows all over the country and we don’t always know if we will have access to electricity, so we always bring our power inverter.” -Michael D.Z., Wichita, Kansas

We developed a BBQ that grills meat and vegetables and produces flavors people have likely never experienced before: slow-cooked spare ribs that melt off the bone, whole juicy chickens that produce enticing aromas and cedar-plank salmon that makes non-seafood lovers fall for fish. Our small wood-pellet grills use electricity to feed the wood pellets into the fire, regulate heat and present LED displays. Our audience of potential buyers can be found at fairs, home-and-garden shows, boat shows, cookout events and farmers markets. We travel a lot to be a part of these shows and markets, and we see a lot of different types. If it’s a show we’ve never done before, we don’t always know how accessible power will be. Or, even worse, sometimes the coordinators charge extra for power. So, we always bring our own power inverters.

When people approach our booth, they expect two things: 1. To see how our grill works. 2. Free food.

If we don’t have power, we can’t show off our grills. We wouldn’t be able to fill the area with delicious smells and captivate the hungry stomachs of those who pass by. No one is going to buy a grill if they can’t see how it works or taste some flavorful food grilled on it. It’s one thing to talk about how great something is; it’s quite another to let them smell, see and taste it.

With our power inverters, we can hook up normal deep-cycle batteries and have mobile power wherever we go. The power from our pure sine power inverters provide us with electricity that’s nearly identical to the electricity that comes out of electrical outlets. It’s easy as can be. We simply make sure our batteries have a full charge before we head out, then we set up our booth so we can plug right into the power inverters, which are converting power from the batteries. Because we like to have multiple grills spread out (so we can cook different dishes simultaneously for our audience), we elected to go with multiple power inverters; we bought two. Each of them pulls from it’s own battery bank. We could have ran a  larger bank of batteries with one power inverter with a higher capacity, but we decided against it in case we needed to do two separate shows on the same day. If that’s the case, we can both take one inverter.

If the show provides power, we simply leave the power inverters in the trailer. After all, if free power is available from the show, we’re going to us it!

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